Tacx NEO 2T Smart Trainer: Details // Unboxing // Initial Review

The flagship direct drive trainer from TACX gets an update with the Neo 2T. With a more powerful motor/resistance unit, quieter operation, and native thru-axle support. Pedal stroke analysis is soon to be implemented in the form of Cycling Dynamics. My video contains all the details, the unboxing, and my initial review (not final review) of the Neo 2T Smart.

Updates to the NEO 2T at a glance:

  • Native thru-axle support (no adapter required)
  • More powerful resistance unit (Addressing “virtual tyre slip”)
  • Even quieter operation (Internal neodymium magnets realigned)
  • Pedal Analysis supporting open standards (More compatibility)

NEO 2T Unit Specifications:

  • Direct Drive Interactive Smart Trainer
  • Bike compatibility: QR 130/135mm. 142x12mm and 148x12mm Native Thru-Axle.
  • Shimano/SRAM compatible freehub. (No cassette supplied)
  • Wireless protocols: ANT+, ANT+ FE-C, Bluetooth Smart, Bluetooth FTMS
  • Data Transmission: Speed, Cadence, Power, (+ trainer control)
  • Power Accuracy Claims: Lower than 1% error
  • Calibration: Not required! Nice!
  • Grade simulation: 25%
  • Max wattage: 2200W
  • Downhill Drive / Road Surface Simulation.
  • Flywheel size/weight: “Mass inertia” 125kg / 275.6lbs
  • Noise level: Really quiet. Really. (Magnet realignment)
  • Unit weight: 24.8kgs/54.7lbs (whole box)
  • Works with or without a power supply (no downhill drive w/o)
  • Front wheel riser block supplied

Tacx Neo on Amazon: http://bit.ly/tacxazon

Categories: Garmin, Tacx, Trainer

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7 replies

  1. Hi Shane, good video, troubling concerns.
    Having just returned a trainer due to 3 belt failures, I am looking to get a new trainer and the Neo is taking my interest because it doesn’t have belts, the unit quality looks great and no need to perform calibration spin downs.
    However I suffered with 10% error in reported power when the other trainer did work, ruining any chance of power consistency between indoor and outdoor training and makes me very nervous about buying another unit.
    Your video says that you are seeing errors with the Neo2T, not seen on the Neo2, but you say it should get resolved.
    My question is: you hope that firmware updates will hopefully resolve this, but at what point would you say that it is safe to purchase the Neo2T. I.e. can we have a certain faith that firmware alone will solve this, or is there potential that this is a latent hardware issue that cannot be resolved without replacing the unit. And given the experience i have just had trying to convince a manufacturer that there was an issue, would it be better to delay?
    Thanks

  2. I’m hesitant to recommend anything until I see it working with my own eyes… or am provided with data from reliable sources. At this point the Neo 2T is still in the naughty corner. I’ll do a follow up as soon as this changes.

  3. Thanks and understood – I look forward to it reflecting on it’s bad behaviour and being allowed out of the naughty corner and of course, your follow up.

  4. Hi again Shane,

    So I saw in DCRainmaker’s Trainer recommendations post, suggesting that the latest firmware may have solved some accuracy issues with the Neo 2T. I.e. “All three of these are accurate (notably so for me with the latest Tacx NEO 2T firmware 0.31).”

    May I ask if you have had a chance to run this firmware through the LamaLab and if so whether you have seen any resolution to the issues seen.

    The question seems academic at this stage as the Neo 2T doesn’t seem to have hit Aussie stores, only the Neo 2 at a discount.

    As always appreciate your thoughts and opinions.

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